The Mindset Shift That Will Transform Your Preaching

Pastor, you have an amazing job. You get to invest in people, share the word of God with them on a regular basis, shepherd them through difficulties, and so much more. Every Sunday, when you open the word of God and share it with the congregation, it pierces hearts, speaks to situations, and brings people closer to God.The Mindset Shift That Will Transform Your Preaching

But we have a problem. And it needs to be addressed right now. You see, we don’t have this problem at conferences. No. We experience the opposite at conferences. We don’t have this problem when we go to the large church in our area. But we do have this problem when we’re preaching. 

Time for a Mindset Shift

We suffer from an abundant lack of expectancy. We prepare a sermon throughout the week, ministering to people throughout, leading meetings, implementing strategic plans for the future and, yet, all the while we are doubting what God will actually do throughout the week and on Sunday. 

If most of us were honest, we’d probably admit that we are more expectant when arriving to a major conference than we are when arriving to the church building for Sunday services. This is a major problem.

It’s time for a shift. We must begin seeing the power of God throughout history and begin to expect that He will fulfill His magnificent purposes even today.

The Necessity for Preaching With Expectancy

God’s word doesn’t return void. Why, then, do we not expect God to cut to people’s hearts through the unique presentation of His word in the sermons we’ve prepared? 

If we were honest with ourselves, we would see that preaching without expectancy for God to display His power is disingenuous and an extreme lack of faith.

Here’s what I know: every time anyone preaches a sermon from the word of God, it speaks to people in the very situation they are dealing with. They walk away having experienced God speaking to them through our feeble sermons. How humbling. How powerful HE is!

We serve a POWERFUL God. If we don’t preach with an expectancy that He will change hearts, transform relationships, and bring people to their knees in surrender to Him, then what’s the point? Why should we even bother?

The interesting thing in all this is that even if we don’t expect Him to do anything, He still does work – we just don’t readily see it and aren’t as open to experiencing His work in and through us.

I’m Grateful for Expectant Preachers

I’m grateful for the fact that six and a half years ago, I began hearing sermons from expectant preachers. And their passion, their zeal, their expectancy, was seen by me – a heathen who was searching. God used many, many sermons to show me His grace, His power, and the necessity for me to respond. God used His preachers to present the word of God – and my heart was pierced. I surrendered to God in the context of His preached word. I was called into ministry in the context of His preached word. 

Be expectant, preacher.

Expectancy Will Transform Your Preaching

When you prepare your sermon in expectancy, when you deliver your sermon in expectancy, you do so in the place of faith. You believe that God will do what He wants to do with that sermon you are struggling through. 

When you are expecting God to do something with His preached word, you approach Sunday with anticipation, with energy, with a renewed sense of His ultimate power. 

And your people will notice.

Passion for your great, powerful God will leak. You’ll preach with the kind of authenticity and zeal that will disrupt people’s casual commitment to Christ.

Transform your preaching. Preach in the place of expectancy.

Believe that God will do far more than you can ask or imagine. Believe it. Preach it. And see what He will do through it all.

Written by Brandon Kelley

Brandon Kelley is the co-founder of Rookie Preacher and the author of Preaching Sticky Sermons and Crucified to Life. He serves as the Spiritual Development Pastor at a fast growing church in Batavia, Ohio, called The Crossing. Among the many things he does at The Crossing, serving on the teaching team is one of them. He also writes at BrandonKelley.org. You can follow him @BrandonKelley_. Watch his sermons here.